Mountain West Chiropractic

NeuroBolic Health Center

Thyroid

The thyroid gland or simply, the thyroid, in vertebrate anatomy, is one of the largest endocrine glands. The thyroid gland is found in the neck, below the thyroid cartilage which forms the "Adam's apple". The thyroid gland controls how quickly the body uses energy, makes proteins, and controls how sensitive the body is to other hormones. It participates in these processes by producing thyroid hormones.

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Low Thyroid Signs and Symptoms

Functional Thyroid Disorders

Functional thyroid disorders are very common and generally overlooked in today's healthcare model. Most patients that have functional thyroid imbalances do not have primary thyroid imbalances. Thyroid metabolism is very sensitive to slight alterations in metabolism. Thyroid hormone synthesis is altered by luteal phase function, progesterone, and autoimmunity, etc. Thyroid hormone binding is influenced by essential fatty acid metabolism, testosterone, estrogen, etc. Thyroid hormone peripheral conversion is dependent on proper diodinase activity and can be altered by cortisol, estrogen, hepatic dysfunction, dysbiosis, etc. Thyroid hormone receptor binding and response may be altered by inflammation, vitamin A status, and essential fatty acid levels, etc. In this section of the notes we will briefly review thyroid hormone physiology, laboratory markers for thyroid evaluation, nutrients to support the thyroid, exogenous thyroid hormone replacement, and drugs that alter thyroid metabolism.

Thyroid Review

Once the thyroid is stimulated by Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) from the pituitary, it produces thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) by transporting iodine into the thyroid and by stimulating Thyroid Peroxidase Activity (TPO). TPO is involved in the formation of T4 and T3 as it catalyzes the oxidation of iodine using hydrogen peroxide. The thyroid will produce 94% of the available T4 and 7% of the available T3. As we know, T4 is inactive and T3 is an active thyroid hormone. Therefore, the majority of hormone production at the thyroid is inactive T4. Once the thyroid has produced T4, it is metabolized peripherally from the thyroid into combination T3 hormones in the liver and the gut. Under normal circumstances, about 40% of the available T4 is converted into T3, 20% is converted into reverse T3 (rT3), which is irreversibly inactive, and 20% is converted into T3 sulfate (T3S) and triiodothyroacetic acid (T3AC). T3S and T3AC are inactive thyroid hormones until they circulate into the gastrointestinal tract and are acted upon by intestinal sulfatase into active T3. Gastrointestinal sulfatase activity is dependent upon a healthy gut microflora.

When mainstream medical professionals do thyroid testing they generally test only the TSH, this is a major flaw in their system, we test up to nine thyroid markers.

This enables us to find out what the problem is and where it is starting from. Testing only the TSH tells us that the pituitary gland is not working properly it does not test where the unstable hormone is occurring down the pathway. There is a major difference with thyroid hormone problems other than just TSH.

One other thing to know, there are many other factors in the thyroid patient problem, there are a adrenal issues, hormone issues, cortisol issues, diet issues, and brain function issues. This is what sets us apart we do not just treat thyroid problems, we want to treat the whole body to help your thyroid condition and your overall personal health.